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Legacies of genocide in Rwanda and Indonesia

posted Jun 1, 2018, 2:43 AM by Annemiek Richters

SYMPOSIUM

 

Legacies of genocide in Rwanda and Indonesia

A multigenerational perspective

 

Organised by the Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research (AISSR)

 

12 June, 10-17 hour

 

Both Rwandan and Indonesian modern history were characterized by a series of violent conflicts. The most violent episode in Indonesian history was the 1965-1968 genocide while in Rwandan history it was the 1994 genocide. This symposium will explore in a comparative way what the legacies are of both genocides as experienced by descendants of the generation that consciously lived through the respective genocide episodes - as victim, perpetrator or bystander - and the way these descendants cope with these legacies. 

 

See for more information and registration

http://aissr.uva.nl/content/events/symposia/2018/06/legacies-of-genocide-in-rwanda-and-indonesia.html?page=2&pageSize=20&origin=KUHyM4f8RLeh6D4937fo2A

 

Publications 2018

posted Apr 2, 2018, 8:59 AM by Annemiek Richters   [ updated Dec 16, 2018, 9:48 AM ]

Simon P. N. Groen, Annemiek Richters, Cornelis J. Laban & Walter J. M. Devillé (2018) “Cultural identity among Afghan and Iraqi traumatized refugees: Towards a conceptual framework for mental health care professionals”, Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry 42(1):69-91. DOI 10.1007/s11013-016-9514-7
Available from: https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11013-016-9514-7.pdf
First Online: 20 January 2017.

Sarabwe, E., Richters, A. & Vysma M. (2018) “Marital conflict in the aftermath of genocide in Rwanda: An explorative study within the context of community based sociotherapy. Intervention 16(1):14-21. DOI: 10.1097/WTF.0000000000000147
Available from: www.interventionjournal.org/text.asp?2018/16/1/14/228768
First Online: July 3, 2017

Marie Grâce Kagoyire & Annemiek Richters (2018) “We are the memory representation of our parents”: Intergenerational legacies of genocide among descendants of rape survivors in Rwanda, Torture: Journal on Rehabilitation of Torture Victims and Prevention of Torture 28(3):30-45. Open access. https://tidsskrift.dk/torture-journal/article/view/111183/160248

Veroni Eichelsheim, Lidewyde Berckmoes, Barbora Hola, Theoneste Rutayisire  & Annemiek Richters,  (2018) “Before my time? Addressing the intergenerational legacies of the genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda”, Intervention: Journal of Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Conflict Affected Areas 00:1-9. Open access. http://www.interventionjournal.org/temp/Intervention000-4606546_124745.pdf

Publications 2017

posted Apr 2, 2018, 8:57 AM by Annemiek Richters   [ updated Apr 2, 2018, 8:59 AM ]

Groen, S. P. N., Richters, A., Laban C.J., Devillé, W. L. J. M. (2017) Implementation of the Cultural Formulation through a newly developed Brief Cultural Interview: Pilot data from the Netherlands. Transcultural Psychiatry 54(1):3–22. DOI: 10.1177/1363461516678342
Available from: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1363461516678342
First Online: December 15, 2016

Ingabire, C.M., Kagoyire, G., Karangwa, D. Ingabire, N., Habarugira, N., Jansen, A. & Richters, A. (2017) Trauma informed restorative justice through community based
sociotherapy in Rwanda. Intervention: Journal of Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Conflict Affected Areas 15(1):241-253.
Abstract available from: www.interventionjournal.com/content/november-2017-volume-15-issue-3

Berckmoes, L., Eichelsheim, V., Rutayisire, T., Richters, A. and Hola, B. (2017) “How legacies of genocide are transmitted in the family environment: A qualitative study of two generations in Rwanda. Societies 7, 24; doi:10.3390/soc7030024
Available from: http://www.mdpi.com/2075-4698/7/3/24

Economic development through psychosocial interventions

posted Apr 2, 2018, 8:55 AM by Annemiek Richters   [ updated Apr 2, 2018, 8:55 AM ]

Diogene Karangwa, Annemiek Richters & Mbabazi Mbabazize (2016) “Economic development through psychosocial interventions: Community based socio-therapy program in Muhanga District, Rwanda”, The International Journal of Humanities & Social Studies 4(10):138-150.
Available from: http://theijhss.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/24.-HS1610-094.pdf


Navigating ethnicity in Peru

posted Jan 5, 2016, 12:28 AM by Annemiek Richters   [ updated Apr 2, 2018, 9:00 AM ]

Navigating ethnicity in Peru

Maria-Elena Planas, Barend Middelkoop, Viviana Cruzado & Annemiek Richters (2016) Navigating ethnicity in Peru: a framework for measuring multiple self-identification among indigenous Quechua women, Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies, 11:1, 70-92.

The 'treatment gap' in global mental health reconsidered: Sociotherapy for collective trauma in Rwanda

posted Jan 5, 2016, 12:27 AM by Annemiek Richters   [ updated Apr 2, 2018, 9:01 AM ]

Stefan Jansen, Ross White, Jemma Hogwood, Angela Jansen, Darius Gishoma, Donatelli Mukamana & Annemiek Richters (2015) “The 'treatment gap' in global mental health reconsidered: Sociotherapy for collective trauma in Rwanda”, European Journal of Psychotraumatology. Published on line 19 November 2015.

Enhancing family and community resilience and wellbeing across the generations

posted Jan 5, 2016, 12:21 AM by Annemiek Richters   [ updated Apr 2, 2018, 9:02 AM ]

Annemiek Richters (2015) “Enhancing family and community resilience and wellbeing across the generations: The contribution of community-based sociotherapy in post-genocide Rwanda”, International Journalof Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience 17(3): 661-663.

Young boys behind bars: An ethnographic study of violence and care in South Africa

posted Mar 11, 2015, 1:10 PM by Annemiek Richters   [ updated Mar 19, 2015, 12:40 PM ]

Thesis defense by Heidi Sauls, 19 March 2015, Agnietenkapel, University of Amsterdam

Promotores Prof.dr. J.M. Richters and Prof.dr. R. Reis
Co-promotor: Prof.dr. S. Pendlebury

Young boys behind bars: An ethnographic study of violence and care in South Africa

This PhD thesis is the result of an ethnographic study that delves into the world of boys, younger than 16 years old and awaiting trial behind bars in a secure care facility. These young boys have committed crimes ranging from theft to rape in South Africa. In this thesis, the reader is introduced to some of these boys. We get to know who these boys are, where they come from, why they were institutionalised and what they endured in their daily lives outside the institution.

The core of this thesis describes the social composition of a secure care facility and the daily activities and interactions that take place within its walls. We follow the boys in the trajectories they took inside and outside the criminal justice system and obtain glimpses of their families, communities and staff with whom they come into contact.

How are socio-cultural and legal-political perceptions of violent children reflected in the infrastructural arrangements and regulations of secure care facilities in South Africa ? In these facilities, how are the lives of these boys enacted on a daily basis ? And how do institutionalised boys perceive themselves inside and outside the institution ? These were the three main research questions that steered this study.

Soldiers in exile: The military habitus and identities of former Zimbabwean soldiers in South Africa

posted Mar 11, 2015, 12:58 PM by Annemiek Richters   [ updated Aug 4, 2015, 2:15 AM ]

Graduation Godfrey Maringira as Doctor Philosophiae, 18 March 2015
Department of Anthropology and Sociology, University of the Western Cape, Capetown, South Africa
Supervisor: Prof D M Gibson
Co-supervisors: Prof J M Richters and Dr L Nunez

Soldiers in exile: The military habitus and identities of former Zimbabwean soldiers in South Africa

This study focuses on former soldiers of the Zimbabwe National Army: most deserted from the army because of declining professionalism, increased politicisation and promotion becoming dependent on loyalty to ZANU-PF rather than the Zimbabwean nation state. As exiles in South Africa they form a community of shared experience: of military service, having fought in wars in Mozambique and DRC and running the risk of detention of torture if they return to Zimbabwe. While many studies on former soldiers argue that military identities are fluid and that combatants can be demobilized and become civilians, Maringira’s thesis shows, contrastingly, that these deserters effectively remain soldiers. They cling to their military identities and military being as social and economic resource in their post-combat life. Because they are not South African citizens they lack security and status and are separated from their families. The thesis was recommended for publication and opens up new areas of research on ex-combatants.

Healing and change in the city of gold: Case studies of coping and support in Johannesburg

posted Oct 23, 2014, 3:45 AM by Annemiek Richters   [ updated Apr 2, 2018, 9:03 AM ]


Dostin Lakika, Peter Kankonde, Annemiek Richters (2015) "Violence, Suffering and Support: Congolese Forced Migrants’ Experiences of Psychosocial Services in Johannesburg", in Ingrid Palmary, Brandon Hamber, Lorena Núñez (eds) Healing and change in the city of gold: Case studies of coping and support in Johannesburg, pp. 101-119. Springer Verlag.

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